Make My Commitment

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How to Use

From the list of faith traditions below, click the name of the one you most identify with to reveal an inspirational intro. Then click "This Is My Tradition" to be directed down to the "My Motivation" box.

Click the white box that says "My Motivation" and tell us about why you are making a personal commitment to live more sustainably. Now is the time to share a few words about your personal story!

Scroll down to the three categories of commitments: Transportation, Energy, and Food. Identify which commitment you want to make, and click on it to reveal a helpful fact. Then click the green "Commit" button. (Repeat to make multiple commitments!)

Enter your title (Dr., Ms., Fr., etc.) and other info. Click the green box underneath to read our data policy, then click the first small white box to accept. You can also click the second white box to help share your commitment publicly. Finally, click the orange button that says "I COMMIT ..."

Identify your faith tradition again from the row of names, or feel free to explore the others. Select one photo that you like the most from the top row. Then select one quote that you like the most from the bottom row. Next, scroll down to see your Quote Card and your Commitment Card.

Click the green button that says "Generate My Card". When the pop-up box asks you to "Save File", click "OK" to save the card in your Downloads folder. You can now share this image via email and social media platforms. Tell the world how and why you are Living the Change!

Start Here

First, please select your tradition from the list below…

Throughout history, people have been moved to make amazing sacrifices for the sake of their fellow human beings or for the sake of all that is good. Think of the White Helmets rescuers in Syria, the Thai cave rescue or, at an everyday level, carers of loved ones with a disability and dedicated volunteers in the welfare and environmental sectors of our own society.

We are challenged here ourselves to make sacrifices, to “live simply so others may simply live”, as Gandhi put it. But this simplicity will also allow us a freedom to live in genuine peace, happiness and harmony with each other and with the natural world. For each of us, may our connection with our spiritual beliefs and values now inspire us to make changes to the way we live, to help build a fair and safe world for coming generations.

This is my tradition

Baha'is believe in the oneness of humankind, that we are all one family in the sight of God. We know that poor people are affected first, and that future generations will suffer the most from the devastating impacts of climate change such as more severe heatwaves, droughts, floods, storms, and sea level rise. It is our responsibility to do all we can to reduce the suffering of our family members all around the world. We can all strive to live more environmentally responsible lives and to reduce carbon pollution caused by our lifestyles.

Baha'u'llah admonished us to lead a simple life. He wrote that a true spiritual seeker must ”be content with little, and be freed from all inordinate desire.” Moreover, He emphasized justice: “Whoso cleaveth to justice, can, under no circumstances, transgress the limits of moderation. The civilization, so often vaunted by the learned exponents of arts and sciences, will, if allowed to overleap the bounds of moderation, bring great evil upon men... If carried to excess, civilization will prove as prolific a source of evil as it had been of goodness when kept within the restraints of moderation...” The Universal House of Justice warns us of materialism and consumerism and writes “Every choice a Bahá’í makes … leaves a trace, and the moral duty to lead a coherent life demands that one’s economic decisions be in accordance with lofty ideals ...” “Let deeds, not words, be your adorning” inspires environmentally responsible actions.

This is my tradition

There has never been a more important time in history to bring the resources of Buddhism to bear on behalf of all living beings. (Buddhism’s) Four Noble Truths provide a framework for diagnosing our current situation and formulating appropriate guidelines—because the threats and disasters we face ultimately stem from the human mind… Our ecological emergency is a larger version of the perennial human predicament. Both as individuals and as a species, we suffer from a sense of self that feels disconnected not only from other people but from the Earth itself.

As Thich Nhat Hanh has said, “We are here to awaken from the illusion of our separateness.” We need to wake up and realize that the Earth is our mother as well as our home—and in this case the umbilical cord binding us to her cannot be severed. When the Earth becomes sick, we become sick, because we are part of her. - “The Time To Act Is Now,” the Buddhist Statement on Climate Change.

This is my tradition

Addressing climate change and environmental destruction is an opportunity to fulfill the core values of our faith. As Christians, we are called to love one another, and especially the “least of these.”

Our most vulnerable sisters and brothers are disproportionately affected by the climate crisis and environmental degradation. Solving it is a way to protect them, and our children and grandchildren after us, from increased sickness, hunger, and conflict. In Genesis, humanity is called to keep the garden God created, and Pope Francis teaches us that “living our vocation to be protectors of God’s handiwork is essential to a life of virtue; it is not an optional or a secondary aspect of our Christian experience.”(Laudato Si’, 217) As the urgency to solve our environmental crisis grows, we commit ourselves to protecting creation our common home.

This is my tradition

Seeking God’s truth through prayer and study of the bible, the global evangelical community has reached a consensus that care for creation is indeed a “gospel issue within the lordship of Christ,” and that caring for God’s loving gift of creation is “an integral part of our mission and an expression of our worship to God for his wonderful plan of redemption through Jesus Christ.”(1)

Today, however, we face undeniable ecological crises, like global climate change, which evangelicals can no longer afford to be complacent about, or endlessly debate without taking decisive action. “Love for God, our neighbors and the wider creation, as well as our passion for justice, compel us to “urgent and prophetic ecological responsibility.”” (2) Making a Living the Change commitment is an opportunity for evangelical Christians, “in dependence on the Holy Spirit, to respond radically and faithfully to care for God’s creation, demonstrating our belief and hope in the transforming power of Christ.” It is a way to take a take a personal step of faith “to live within the proper boundaries of God’s good gift in creation, to engage further in its restoration and conservation, and to equitably share its bounty with each other.” (3)

Acting faithfully and determinedly because we are convinced that is what God desires of his beloved disciples, regardless of whether most other people are making other choices, is one of the best traits of evangelical Christians. Our joy, as the scripture tells us, is “seeking first God’s Kingdom” (Matt. 6:33). Making a personal lifestyle commitment consistent with caring for the gift of creation may seem too difficult, and/or insignificant and silly in light of the choices that most other people are making, but as we know acting faithfully, maybe even especially in the small things, is what matters to God. The World Evangelical Alliance, the Lausanne Movement, and many other evangelical pastors, leaders, and organizations supporting Living the Change encourage you to pray, step out, and make a personal lifestyle commitment in your walk with Jesus that expresses your love for Christ, care for God’s gift of creation, and love for your neighbor who like you is dependent on healthy ecosystems for clean air, water, food, and all the other necessities of life.

1. Cape Town Commitment, I.7.A. (2011) and Creation Care and the Gospel: Call to Action (2012).

2. Creation Care and the Gospel: Call to Action, (2012).

3. Creation Care and the Gospel: Call to Action, (2012)

This is my tradition

As Christians we are grateful for events in the Christian calendar like the Season of Creation that help us to rejoice in the good gift of creation and to reflect on how we care for it. It offers us a precious opportunity to pause in the midst of our day-to-day lives and contemplate the fabric of life into which we are woven.

As the environmental crisis deepens, we Christians are urgently called to witness to our faith by taking bold action to preserve the gift we share. As the psalmist sings, “The earth is the Lord's and the fullness thereof, the world and those who dwell therein.” (Psalm 24:1-2)  We may ask ourselves: Do our actions honor the Lord as Creator? Are there ways to deepen our faith by protecting “the least of these,” who are most vulnerable to the consequences of environmental degradation?

We encourage you to join hands with fellow sisters and brothers in Christ who are also praying, stepping out, and making personal Living the Change lifestyle commitments compelled by their love for Christ, their desire to be faithful to the unequivocal biblical call to care for God’s gift of creation, and as a means to actively love our neighbors, who like us are dependent on healthy ecosystems for clean air, water, food, and all other necessities of life too.

adapted from the 2018 Season of Creation letter

This is my tradition

In an age of significant environmental concern, as Hindus we must expand our conception of dharma. We must consider the effects of our actions not just on ourselves and those humans around us, but also on all beings.

As Hindus we revere all life, human, non-human, plant, and animal. Our rivers are all goddesses; our mountains are gods. The landscape as a whole is seen as being full of divinity. The planets and stars are physical objects, but they are also celestial beings, they and the space between them full of divinity. When we embody this, we move beyond just caring for our fellow beings as stewards of a divine creation. We become servants of the Divine, all our actions, including those in protection of the world around us and all the beings therein, becoming acts of worship.

Climate change creates pain, suffering, and violence. Unless we change how we use energy, how we use the land, how we grow our crops, how we treat other animals, and how we use natural resources, we will only further this pain, suffering, and violence. On a personal basis, we can reduce this suffering by beginning to transform our habits, simplifying our lives and material desires, and not taking more than our reasonable share of resources.

(Adapted from the 2015 Hindu Declaration on Climate Change)

This is my tradition

We start with the belief that engaging Jews in environmental education, action, and advocacy changes them, their families, their institutions, and the community as a whole. If we have a set of values which stand purely as values, these include: the value of multi-generational programs; a strong commitment to inclusive community; being both Jewishly serious and open; cultivating leadership; seeking to have impact locally, nationally, and in Israel (and, slowly, elsewhere).

We hold a series of connected beliefs:

that Jewish tradition comes alive when we engage with some of the most important issues of our time such as environmental sustainability, the challenge of living healthily, the question of where our food comes from, etc.

that Jewish life is most powerfully renewed through transformative experiences

that the most powerful transformative experiences bring people together across differences

that effecting change means thinking about multiplier effects: how to inspire and connect people to create and lead their own projects towards our greater goals

properly understood, we believe that renewing Jewish life necessarily involves making a better world for all; and that when Jewish people, as Jewish people, work to renew the world, they necessarily strengthen Jewish life that education, action, and advocacy reinforce each other

Excerpted from Hazon's Theory of Change

This is my tradition

Islamic environmentalism is embedded in the matrix of Islamic teachings. The Qur’an, the holy text of the Muslims, is inherently conservationist and much of it has to do with how humans being relate to the natural world and the benefits that accrue from protecting it. The Qur’an is holistic and it defines humanity’s place in creation as khalifa or steward. There are two layers to Islamic environmentalism: A body of ethics based on the Qur’an which we would define as Knowledge of Creation (Ilm ul khalq) and a body of practical action which we would define as natural resource management (Fiqh al bi’ah).

Almost every opening in the Qur’ān has 1 some kind of reference to the natural world. Its approach is holistic, and it deals with nature on the basis of the human as integral to it. However, we have taken this for granted and have created a disconnection between ourselves and the natural world to the extent that we treat it as the “other.” We have become observers in the life experience we are integral to, and have formed a subject/object dichotomy between ourselves and the natural world where one does not exist. This gap is more acute now than it has ever been and we almost invariably see nature as a resource to be exploited. We once took from it for survival but now we take from it for our aggrandizement. Paradoxically, the gap widens as we come to know and understand more about natural phenomena from subatomic particles to the distant galaxies.

What we now refer to as Islamic environmentalism was a natural way of life when Muslims lived in a way that emulated the example of the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessing be upon him). The Prophet is regarded as the walking Qur’an.

Excerpted from “Exploring Environmental Ethics in Islam – Insights from the Qur’an and the Practice of Prophet Muhammad” by Fazlun Khalid

This is my tradition

Our faith as Quakers is inseparable from our care for the health of our planet Earth. We see that our misuse of the Earth’s resources creates inequality, destroys community, affects health and well-being, leads to war and erodes our integrity. We are all responsible for stewardship of our natural world…. We are at a historical turning point….We recognise that the environmental crisis is a symptom of a wider crisis in our political and economic systems. Our loving and well informed environmental actions as Friends, consistent with our spiritual values, must therefore work to transform these systems.

Many of us all over the Quaker world are taking practical actions as individuals and communities... We must redouble our efforts right now. We must move beyond our individual and collective comfort zones and involve the worldwide Quaker community and others of like mind. Just as Jesus showed us, real change requires us to challenge ourselves to be effective instruments of change. We can do more.

From the FWCC Pisac Minute: Living Sustainably and Sustaining Life on Earth, 2016

This is my tradition

“Let us pray and hope we can come together in love for each other, those who suffer from climate change, future generations, and planet Earth. Let us commit to walk gently on earth.”

(from the 2017 interfaith statement, Walk on Earth Gently)

The essence of faith is fewness of words and abundance of deeds.

Baha'u'llah, Words of Wisdom

“What would it mean for you to live your life as if you really knew, in the depth of your heart and your cells, that you were not separate from this earth and all the earth’s beings?”

Catherine McGee

“There is a nobility in the duty to care for creation through little daily actions.”

(Laudato Si’, 211)

Christ is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation . . . all things were created by him and for him . . . For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in Christ, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross. - Colossians 1:15-20.

The Earth is the Lord's, and the fullness thereof- Psalm 24:1

“But ask the beasts, and they will teach you; the birds of the heavens, and they will tell you; or the bushes of the earth, and they will teach you; and the fish of the sea will declare to you. Who among all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this?”

Job 12:7-9, NRSV

The Earth is my mother and I am her child!

Atharva Veda (12.1.12)

“You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to desist from it.”

Pirkei Avot 2:21

“There are signs on the Earth for people with certainty”

(Qur’an 51:20)

“And the servants of the Most Merciful are those who walk upon the earth gently, and when the ignorant address them harshly, they say words of peace.”

(Qur’an 25:63)

“A simple lifestyle freely chosen is a source of strength.”

Britain Yearly Meeting Advices and Queries 41.

We invite you to take a moment to reflect, meditate or pray about the what motivates you to make commitments. You’ll decide later if you want to keep this to yourself, share only with friends or share it widely.

Choose Your Commitment

We’re excited you want to make a commitment to live more sustainably and adopt new habits that are good for the Earth! We’ve identified a variety of commitments you can consider within three high-impact behavior areas: transportation, energy, and food.

Within each category (below), these commitments are organized from smallest to largest impact. In other words, the most helpful commitments you can make include: “Have one less car in the family”, “Install a solar array to power my residence”, and “Adopt a 100% plant-based diet”.

Please:

  • Try behaviors that are new for you, rather than things you are already doing.

  • Select one or more options below - or send us a message if you want to suggest another type of commitment that isn’t currently listed.

  • Challenge yourself to try behaviors that have the greatest impact - the options farther down each list are the ones that help our planet the most!

  • Make as many commitments as you feel inspired to follow - there is no limit!

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Transportation Commitment

How we travel from one place to another always has an impact on the Earth, no matter how near or far. We invite you to join us in moving around our world more thoughtfully and sustainably.

Happy travels!

Every time you walk, cycle, rollerblade, skateboard, etc. instead of driving for 3 km (2 miles), you save one inflated balloon’s worth of carbon pollution

Instead of driving your car, try riding the bus or train 3 days per week. If you choose the bus, you can save 1 day’s worth of carbon pollution each week. If you choose the train, you can save 2 day’s worth of carbon pollution each week!

About 25% of airplane pollution happens during take-off and landing. If you have to fly, please choose the non-stop flight option whenever possible.

If you choose to commute by bus, rather than driving your own car, you can save an entire season’s worth of carbon pollution over the course of one year. And if you choose to commute by train, you’ll save nearly double that!

If you purchased a new electric car and drove it until it broke down, then bought another electric car and drove that second vehicle until it broke down, you would produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions than buying and driving a single gasoline-powered car. And the batteries from both electric cars could also be reused or recycled!

Every time you choose to avoid a single transatlantic flight, you save more carbon than you would by switching to renewable energy in your home for an entire year!

Every time you choose to avoid a single transatlantic flight, you save more carbon than you would by switching to renewable energy in your home for an entire year … so just imagine how much you could help the Earth by choosing to avoid air travel entirely!

Using one less car in your family (or, ideally, living an entirely car-free lifestyle) is one of the most helpful things you can do for the Earth!

I will share my experiences with keeping commitments, the challenges, rewards, beautiful surprises and spiritual insights with my fellow community members and invite them into conversation and making a commitment to sustainable living, too.

Do you want to make a sustainable transportation commitment that is not listed above? We would be happy to evaluate its impact on climate change and consider adding it as a permanent option here. Please email us today!

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Energy Commitment

How do we heat and cool our homes? When do we use electrical appliances? Where does our electricity come from? We invite you consider these questions and lower your home’s impact on climate change.

Power up!

Using LEDs instead of conventional light bulbs is a helpful step to reducing carbon pollution. The technology is improving each year, making LEDs more efficient and longer-lasting!

Air-drying your clothes can save about as much carbon pollution as recycling your glass, plastic, and paper goods. If you care about recycling, consider no longer using a dryer machine.

Did you know that heating and cooling account for more than half of the energy use in a typical U.S. home? And the numbers are not much better in other developed countries. By keeping your home temperature just a few degrees warmer during summer, you can significantly reduce your carbon footprint.

Did you know that heating and cooling account for more than half of the energy use in a typical U.S. home? And the numbers are not much better in other developed countries. By keeping your home temperature just a few degrees cooler during winter, you can significantly reduce your carbon footprint.

All air-conditioners cause carbon pollution, which represents a serious threat to our planet at scale. Unfortunately, air-conditions can also release hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) — chemical compounds that trap thousands of times as much heat in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide — if they are broken or when they are thrown away. Try minimizing your air-conditioning use in order to conserve electricity, produce less pollution, and require less repair and replacement for your machine.

By using renewable energy to power your home, you can save as much carbon pollution replacing your gas-powered car with an electric car and also replacing all your home’s light bulbs with LEDs!

Using solar energy to power your home is one of the most helpful things you can do for the planet. Depending on how much of your previous energy use came from coal, natural gas, or other unsustainable sources, you could reduce your home’s greenhouse gas emissions by a factor of at least 5 ... and possibly as high as 200!

I will share my experiences with keeping commitments, the challenges, rewards, beautiful surprises and spiritual insights with my fellow community members and invite them into conversation and making a commitment to sustainable living, too.

Do you want to make a sustainable energy commitment that is not listed above? We would be happy to evaluate its impact on climate change and consider adding it as a permanent option here. Please email us today!

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Food Commitment

Meat, cheese, and milk production all create lots of carbon pollution. What we do with “everything we don’t eat” can also hurt the environment … or it can help! We invite you to eat a plant-based diet and compost your non-meat food scraps.

Bon appetit!

Internationally, food waste produces more greenhouse gas emissions than any single country except for China or the United States. In fact, food waste produces more greenhouse gas emissions than Brazil, Germany, Indonesia, Mexico, and Canada combined!

If you and your family decided to skip meat two days per week for an entire year, you would save as much carbon pollution as taking your car off the road for ten weeks!

Most dairy comes from animals known as ruminants — including cows, sheep, and goats — which produce lots of methane gas during their digestion processes. Compared with carbon dioxide, this methane gas is 25 times more effective at trapping heat in our atmosphere!

Composting your leftover fruits, vegetables, grains, and non-animal proteins is the best way to use your “food scraps”. Rather than trapping these items in a landfill where they will decompose and build up dangerous greenhouse gases, try composting them to create a rich fertilizer you can use in your garden!

Meat production requires 11 times more fossil fuels per calorie than grain production. And this doesn’t even take into account the negative impacts of animal waste, refrigeration, storage, transportation, and even greater environmental concerns!

In the United States, the greenhouse gas emissions from beef production alone are roughly equivalent to the annual emissions of 24 million cars or 33 coal-fired power plants. Lamb — which is categorized alongside beef as “red meat” — is almost as bad for the Earth!

Raising animals for meat accounts for about 10-15% of all the greenhouse gas emissions caused by humans around the world. The percentages are even higher in certain countries that produce and consume a lot of meat, including New Zealand, Australia, Argentina, and the United States.

Eating a plant-based diet saves more carbon pollution than replacing a traditional gas-powered car with a hybrid car. That’s a whole lot of energy and waste!

Eating a 100% plant-based diet — meaning no milk, cheese, eggs, or other animal food products — saves twice as much carbon pollution as eating a vegetarian diet that makes exception for those foods.

I will share my experiences with keeping commitments, the challenges, rewards, beautiful surprises and spiritual insights with my fellow community members and invite them into conversation and making a commitment to sustainable living, too.

Do you want to make a sustainable food commitment that is not listed above? We would be happy to evaluate its impact on climate change and consider adding it as a permanent option here. Please email us today!

I Already…

I Will…

commitment placeholder

You can choose as many commitments as you feel able to complete. If you like you can find more.

Australian First Nation/Aboriginal:

The destruction of the planet has begun through our over-exploitation of our lands and seas. These are not times for blame and accusation. There is a task ahead of all of us to address the outcomes of our avarice and sloth.

Patrick Dodson, Yawuru man

So I take this word reconciliation and I use it to reconcile people back to Mother Earth, so they can walk this land together and heal one another because she’s the one that gives birth to everything we see around us, everything we need to survive.

Max Dulumunmun Harrison

Sikh: Then why get attached to what you will leave behind. Having wealth, you indulge in pleasures bout, From that, tell me, who will bail you out? All your houses, horses, elephants and luxurious cars, They are just pomp and show, all totally false.

Guru Granth Sahib

Get Involved

Add your name to the Interfaith Statement “Walk on Earth Gently” alongside diverse religious, faith, and lay leaders from around the world.

Register to watch the live stream video of the glorious multi-faith service at Grace Cathedral on 12 September, which will kick off the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, California. This will be a truly unique opportunity for us to come together in prayer and call for real climate leadership around the world.

Join us in celebrating the first ever Week of Living the Change between 7-14 October. People from diverse religions and spiritualities will come together to share a plant-based community meal, affirm personal stories of sustainable living, and celebrate together with local events around the world! Register your event and apply for funding here.

Be a treasure to the poor, an admonisher to the rich, an answerer of the cry of the needy... Be unjust to no man, and show all meekness to all men... Let integrity and uprightness distinguish all thine acts.

Baha'u'llah

O Ye Rich Ones on Earth! The poor in your midst are My trust; guard ye My trust, and be not intent only on your own ease.

Baha'u'llah, The Hidden Words

We cannot segregate the human heart from the environment outside us… Man is organic with the world. His inner life moulds the environment and is itself also deeply affected by it.

Shoghi Effendi

Get Involved

Add your name to the Interfaith Statement “Walk on Earth Gently” alongside diverse religious, faith, and lay leaders from around the world.

Register to watch the live stream video of the glorious multi-faith service at Grace Cathedral on 12 September, which will kick off the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, California. This will be a truly unique opportunity for us to come together in prayer and call for real climate leadership around the world.

Join us in celebrating the first ever Week of Living the Change between 7-14 October. People from diverse religions and spiritualities will come together to share a plant-based community meal, affirm personal stories of sustainable living, and celebrate together with local events around the world! Register your event and apply for funding here.

Now is the time to manifest the beauty, gentleness, and kindness of our tender human hearts in social forms. The world is longing for such examples.

17th Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje

We are here to awaken from our illusion of separateness. We are imprisoned in our small selves, thinking only of having some comfortable conditions for this small self, while we destroy our large self. If we want to change the situation, we must begin by being our true selves. To be our true selves means we have to be the forest, the river, the ozone layer.

Thích Nhất Hạnh

The entire cosmos is a cooperative. The sun, the moon, and the stars live together as a cooperative. The same is true for humans and animals, trees and soil. Our bodily parts function as a cooperative. When we realize that the world is a mutual, interdependent, cooperative enterprise, that human beings are all mutual friends in the process of birth, old age, suffering, and death, then we can build a noble, even heavenly environment. If our lives are not based in this truth, then we shall all perish.

Peter Levitt

Get Involved

Add your name to the Interfaith Statement “Walk on Earth Gently” alongside diverse religious, faith, and lay leaders from around the world.

Register to watch the live stream video of the glorious multi-faith service at Grace Cathedral on 12 September, which will kick off the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, California. This will be a truly unique opportunity for us to come together in prayer and call for real climate leadership around the world.

Join us in celebrating the first ever Week of Living the Change between 7-14 October. People from diverse religions and spiritualities will come together to share a plant-based community meal, affirm personal stories of sustainable living, and celebrate together with local events around the world! Register your event and apply for funding here.

“Hear both the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor”

(Laudato Si’, 49)

“Glance at the sun. See the moon and the stars. Gaze at the beauty of earth’s greenings. Now, think. What delight God gives to humankind with all these things . . . All nature is at the disposal of humankind. We are to work with it. For without it we cannot survive.” (Hildegard of Bingen)

“In addressing the challenge of climate change, everyone has a part to play.”

(Irish Bishops’ Conference)

Get Involved

Add your name to the Interfaith Statement “Walk on Earth Gently” alongside diverse religious, faith, and lay leaders from around the world.

Register to watch the live stream video of the glorious multi-faith service at Grace Cathedral on 12 September, which will kick off the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, California. This will be a truly unique opportunity for us to come together in prayer and call for real climate leadership around the world.

Join us in celebrating the first ever Week of Living the Change between 7-14 October. People from diverse religions and spiritualities will come together to share a plant-based community meal, affirm personal stories of sustainable living, and celebrate together with local events around the world! Register your event and apply for funding here.

"The Earth is the Lord's, and the fullness thereof."

Psalm 24:1

"Christ is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation . . . all things were created by him and for him . . . For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in Christ, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross."

Colossians 1:15-20

Caring for God’s loving gift of creation is “an integral part of our mission and an expression of our worship to God for his wonderful plan of redemption through Jesus Christ.”

Creation Care and the Gospel: Call to Action, 2012

Get Involved

Add your name to the Interfaith Statement “Walk on Earth Gently” alongside diverse religious, faith, and lay leaders from around the world.

Register to watch the live stream video of the glorious multi-faith service at Grace Cathedral on 12 September, which will kick off the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, California. This will be a truly unique opportunity for us to come together in prayer and call for real climate leadership around the world.

Join us in celebrating the first ever Week of Living the Change between 7-14 October. People from diverse religions and spiritualities will come together to share a plant-based community meal, affirm personal stories of sustainable living, and celebrate together with local events around the world! Register your event and apply for funding here.

“But ask the beasts, and they will teach you; the birds of the heavens, and they will tell you; or the bushes of the earth, and they will teach you; and the fish of the sea will declare to you. Who among all these does not know that the hand of the Lord has done this?”

Job 12:7-9, NRSV

“The earth is the Lord's and the fullness thereof, the world and those who dwell therein.”

Psalm 24:1-2

Get Involved

Add your name to the Interfaith Statement “Walk on Earth Gently” alongside diverse religious, faith, and lay leaders from around the world.

Register to watch the live stream video of the glorious multi-faith service at Grace Cathedral on 12 September, which will kick off the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, California. This will be a truly unique opportunity for us to come together in prayer and call for real climate leadership around the world.

Join us in celebrating the first ever Week of Living the Change between 7-14 October. People from diverse religions and spiritualities will come together to share a plant-based community meal, affirm personal stories of sustainable living, and celebrate together with local events around the world! Register your event and apply for funding here.

The Earth is my mother and I am her child!

Atharva Veda (12.1.12)

Dharma exists for the welfare of all beings. Hence, that by which the welfare of all living beings is sustained, that for sure is dharma

Mahabharata

Know that all opulent, beautiful and glorious creations spring from but a spark of My splendor

Bhagavad-Gita

Get Involved

Add your name to the Interfaith Statement “Walk on Earth Gently” alongside diverse religious, faith, and lay leaders from around the world.

Register to watch the live stream video of the glorious multi-faith service at Grace Cathedral on 12 September, which will kick off the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, California. This will be a truly unique opportunity for us to come together in prayer and call for real climate leadership around the world.

Join us in celebrating the first ever Week of Living the Change between 7-14 October. People from diverse religions and spiritualities will come together to share a plant-based community meal, affirm personal stories of sustainable living, and celebrate together with local events around the world! Register your event and apply for funding here.

The Torah is a commentary on the world, and the world is a commentary on the Torah.

—This motto reflects our determination to apply Jewish thought to some of the greatest challenges of our time – and our belief that the act of doing so is good not only for the world, but also for the renewal of Jewish life itself.

"If I am not for myself, who will be for me? But if I am only for myself, who am I? If not now, when?"

Pirkei Avot 1:14

Upon creating the first human beings, God guided them around the Garden of Eden, saying; 'Look at my creations! See how beautiful and perfect they are! I created everything for you. Make sure you don't ruin or destroy My world. If you do, there will be no one after you to fix it'

Midrash Kohelet (Ecclesiastes) Rabbah 7:13

Get Involved

Add your name to the Interfaith Statement “Walk on Earth Gently” alongside diverse religious, faith, and lay leaders from around the world.

Register to watch the live stream video of the glorious multi-faith service at Grace Cathedral on 12 September, which will kick off the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, California. This will be a truly unique opportunity for us to come together in prayer and call for real climate leadership around the world.

Join us in celebrating the first ever Week of Living the Change between 7-14 October. People from diverse religions and spiritualities will come together to share a plant-based community meal, affirm personal stories of sustainable living, and celebrate together with local events around the world! Register your event and apply for funding here.

“It is He who has appointed you vicegerents upon the earth, and has raised some of you in rank above others, that He may try you in what He has given you. Surely your Lord is swift in reckoning; and surely He is All-Forgiving, All-Compassionate.”

(Qur’an 6:165)

“O you who have believed, eat from the good things which We have provided for you and be grateful to Allah if it is indeed Him that you worship.”

(Qur’an 2:172)

Eat and drink from the provision of Allah , and do not commit abuse on the earth, spreading corruption.”

(Qur’an 2:60)

Get Involved

Add your name to the Interfaith Statement “Walk on Earth Gently” alongside diverse religious, faith, and lay leaders from around the world.

Register to watch the live stream video of the glorious multi-faith service at Grace Cathedral on 12 September, which will kick off the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, California. This will be a truly unique opportunity for us to come together in prayer and call for real climate leadership around the world.

Join us in celebrating the first ever Week of Living the Change between 7-14 October. People from diverse religions and spiritualities will come together to share a plant-based community meal, affirm personal stories of sustainable living, and celebrate together with local events around the world! Register your event and apply for funding here.

"We commit to... radically changed ways of living. Let us do so out of joy, celebration, reverence and a deep love of life."

Australian Friends Statement on Earthcare, 2008

“We are called to work for the peaceable Kingdom of God on the whole earth, in right sharing with all peoples.”

Kabarak Call for Peace and Ecojustice, World Conference of Friends, 2012

“We see this Earth as a stunning gift that supports life. It is our only home. Let us care for it together"

Facing the Challenge of Climate Change: A shared statement by Quaker groups, 2015

Get Involved

Add your name to the Interfaith Statement “Walk on Earth Gently” alongside diverse religious, faith, and lay leaders from around the world.

Register to watch the live stream video of the glorious multi-faith service at Grace Cathedral on 12 September, which will kick off the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, California. This will be a truly unique opportunity for us to come together in prayer and call for real climate leadership around the world.

Join us in celebrating the first ever Week of Living the Change between 7-14 October. People from diverse religions and spiritualities will come together to share a plant-based community meal, affirm personal stories of sustainable living, and celebrate together with local events around the world! Register your event and apply for funding here.

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